WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN

it means that some people think they are that worthless that they will settle for abusive love. they attract the people that treat them how they think they deserve to be treated. others may have their sense of self-worth so won’t settle for anything below what they deserve. how you view yourself is how you’re going to be treated is what it’s saying. so, if you think you deserve more for yourself, that’s what you’re going to get, but if you don’t think you’re a good person, you will settle for much less than you really do deserve. don’t depreciate yourself, because one day you’re going to find someone who will give you everything you deserve and more.


WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN

it means that some people think they are that worthless that they will settle for abusive love. they attract the people that treat them how they think they deserve to be treated. others may have their sense of self-worth so won’t settle for anything below what they deserve. how you view yourself is how you’re going to be treated is what it’s saying. so, if you think you deserve more for yourself, that’s what you’re going to get, but if you don’t think you’re a good person, you will settle for much less than you really do deserve. don’t depreciate yourself, because one day you’re going to find someone who will give you everything you deserve and more.

(Source: krazkastra, via simplyyjess)

@1 hour ago with 456769 notes
luanlegacy:

nenekantoku:

Do you ever stop and think that inside those titans there were two tiny kids. Because I do. And I cry like a baby.

inside those titans are hundreds of kids, because they eat people

luanlegacy:

nenekantoku:

Do you ever stop and think that inside those titans there were two tiny kids. Because I do. And I cry like a baby.

inside those titans are hundreds of kids, because they eat people

(via erinmayfong)

@1 hour ago with 2699 notes

mstrkrftz:

Time Stacks by Matt Molloy

(Source: mstrkrftz, via connnie)

@15 hours ago with 50545 notes

At noon on the grassy slope where a single building stood, sounds of battle cries and steel meeting steel rang out as each of two teams of vikings attempted to out flank the other. On each side, the sword wielders parried and blocked as their two handed spear and poleaxe brethren jabbed and struck. Reinforcements arrives on the left flank of Team A and overwhelms Team B. Flanked and outmaneuvered, the left side attempts to consolidate into a small semi-circle, but fails and are struck down. Odin’s hall seats a few hundred more tonight.

The battle having ended, I walked over to the food stands and stumbled across a live ‘band’ playing what appeared to be medieval instruments. During the next song, the lead singer of the group gave us various lines. I, not knowing Danish, managed to hum the tune. The string instruments began singing and the drums beat out a hypnotic cross-rhythm. We joined in clapping, and the singer, approaching the chorus, waved her hands and beckoned us to join her in lyric. The various voices combined to create what felt like the movie depiction of a medieval bar.

- Memories at the Moesgaard Viking Moot

@16 hours ago
There’s a couple ballroom dancing in the background!

There’s a couple ballroom dancing in the background!

(Source: phootgraphs)

@17 hours ago with 2 notes

I sit facing the tall masts of sailing ships in front of the colorful houses Copenhagen is so famous for. People walk along the bustling canal sipping beers and chatting away, while I sit alone listening to the sounds of the city. My waiter places a plate of steaming hot fish in front of me, and the faint smell of lemon begins to infiltrate my nostrils. I take a bite of the potatoes on the side. I’m suddenly aware of the faint sound of music to my right. Upon closer inspection, it’s a busker playing the violin and a few bites later, he moves over in front of our restaurant and serenades the diners.

I finish eating, and go over to drop a coin for the violinist. As I sit on the edge of the canal, listening to a few more scores, I feel the temperature drop and another minute later, a raindrop wets my face. Another falls on my leg, and another hits my arm. Pretty soon, everyone is running for cover under the dining umbrellas and archways of doors. The rain passes in a few minutes and the waiters are drenched from trying to help customers out.

Memories in Nyhavn

@1 day ago with 3 notes

Danish women have the most perfect noses. I cant even. Think the curved shape of Elsa’s in Frozen.

@3 days ago
vakarrrian:

The Most Unusual Guns in the World


The Apache Revolver is certainly an intimidating weapon. It features a knuckle duster grip and a double-edged knife in addition to its pepperbox gun. Both the knuckle duster and the knife could be folded up, creating a very compact, yet multi-functional, weapon. Unfortunately, it was not the most effective of weapons. It had limited accuracy range and proved to really only be useful at very close range.

This weapon was produced during the late 1800’s by French manufacturer, L. Dolne à Liege. The gun became popular with the violent gang, Les Apaches in early 1900’s-France. It was the association with this notorious group that resulted in the Apache name.
The Apache Revolver is chambered for 7mm ammunition, though a 9mm variant exists that was rumored to have been used by British forces during World War II.
Most likely due to its age, the Apache Revolver can be difficult for a collector to find. If you are lucky enough to find one for sale, you can expect to pay anywhere from $1,000 to $4,000 for one, depending upon its condition.

vakarrrian:

The Most Unusual Guns in the World

The Apache Revolver is certainly an intimidating weapon. It features a knuckle duster grip and a double-edged knife in addition to its pepperbox gun. Both the knuckle duster and the knife could be folded up, creating a very compact, yet multi-functional, weapon. Unfortunately, it was not the most effective of weapons. It had limited accuracy range and proved to really only be useful at very close range.

This weapon was produced during the late 1800’s by French manufacturer, L. Dolne à Liege. The gun became popular with the violent gang, Les Apaches in early 1900’s-France. It was the association with this notorious group that resulted in the Apache name.

The Apache Revolver is chambered for 7mm ammunition, though a 9mm variant exists that was rumored to have been used by British forces during World War II.

Most likely due to its age, the Apache Revolver can be difficult for a collector to find. If you are lucky enough to find one for sale, you can expect to pay anywhere from $1,000 to $4,000 for one, depending upon its condition.

(via greeenarrow)

@4 days ago with 111 notes

(Source: weheartit.com, via thatoneurl)

@1 hour ago with 2461 notes

killermuffins89:

innocenttmaan:

Andres Amador is an artist who uses the beach as his canvas, racing against the tide to create these large scale temporary masterpieces using a rake or stick ..

Andres’ creations are simply stunning and knowing that these delicate creations are temporary somehow makes them even more beautiful.

wow

(via simplyyjess)

@15 hours ago with 277407 notes

Reflections

Today I went to the Viking moot (meet) near Mosegaard museum. I walked around the encampment of tents, stopping at each and every booth to check our wares, some of which included blades with the wavy “persian steel” like patterns, glass beads for necklaces and wristbands, and reenactment clothing and associated accessories. Surprisingly, it seems that historical reenactment is quite a large thing in the Scandinavian countries. The people I spoke to at the shops said that many of them sell replica finds and jewelry for a living.

I enjoyed this a lot, but I think I would have really loved this as a child. There were multiple workshops for children, such as smithing, archery, and textile making. I learned the basics for making rope from tree sinew and got to speak with a bow maker.

Perhaps I’m making a bit of a blanket statement here, but it seems to me that, here in Denmark, there’s a wider access to cultural heritage that’s presented in an engaging manner. I guess it’s fair to say that one reason for this is how homogeneous the population here is, but I feel like there’s a large enough community of various cultures and people that keep in touch with their ancestral heritage in the States that such a ‘fair’ might still work out. Maybe it’s not that the knowledge and demonstration is nonexistent, but that there’s no central place for it all to engage the population. Imagine a Aztec/Mayan cultural fair or a Chinese one….

@16 hours ago
@17 hours ago with 23927 notes

(Source: asylum-art, via oohlachristy)

@1 day ago with 59498 notes

Tonight in Tivoli, I saw the best light show I have ever seen and ate the best ice cream I’ve ever eaten. Full day tomorrow until the train back to Aarhus for sleep and viking moot Sunday near Mosegaard.

@2 days ago with 1 note

3 nights, two days in Rome; 2 nights, 3 days in Florence; 2 nights 1 day in Venice; an evening in London. Ack everything’s so crammed; it’s like a sprint at the end ): made a few bad planning choices, learning i guess.

in other news: roskilde tomorrow, copenhagen saturday, and viking moot on sunday!

@4 days ago